Humboldt Forum Foundation Berlin

From a monastery to the Humboldt Forum

If at all, then in the right way. In Berlin, the Humboldt Forum, which opened in summer 2021 in the rebuilt City Palace, wants to set standards. Also in terms of inclusion. With a specially developed tactile book, sighted, visually impaired and blind people can now experience 700 years of Berlin history.

From the monastery to the palace, the parade ground and the Palace of the Republic – the place in the centre of Berlin has an eventful history. The powerful have built here, rebuilt, demolished and planned again and again. In the Humboldt Forum, this history can now be explored with the fingertips, the eyes or the ears.With a large tactile map, 14 tactile pictures and texts in large print and Braille, the past of the site becomes comprehensible on 64 pages. An audio version completes the book. The tactile books were developed in intensive focus group work with members of the Allgemeine Blinden- und Sehbehindertenverein Berlin gegr. 1874 e. V. and thus meet the needs of the target group.For example, the impressive dome of the palace can be traced with the fingers using tactile foils, and details on the façade can also be seen and felt.Audio descriptions of all the stations from the monastery to the palace complete the offer for visitors.Published by the Humboldt Forum Foundation in the Berlin Palace, the book can be purchased at the Humboldt Forum for 24,90 €.

A Glance at the Book

Studio shot of the closed tactile book "Vom Kloster zum Humboldt Forum" on a white background. The focus of the image is on the title of the book written in bold capitals. These were depicted in bright neon yellow and are printed on the cover's dark grey background.
Another studio shot of the tactile book with focus on the spine. This is particularly striking because of its bright, neon-yellow colouring. The black lettering on the spine is also in transparent braille.
A close-up of the book cover. Here the focus is on the transparent braille, which looks like sparkling drops of water due to the incident light.
Left: A person reading braille on a text page of the tactile book. Right: Close-up of typographic details of a text page with blackletter and transparent braille.
Shown is a section of the open tactile book. The focus of the picture is on the tab system, which divides the book into different chapters. In addition to the printed title of each chapter, the small graphics, which are reminiscent of icons, help with orientation.
A view into the book. You can see the graphically implemented site plan with transparent, tactile lines. The corresponding fold-out legend extends over the left part of the image
A person reading the tactile map just shown with the legend unfolded.

Tactile foils

A close-up of the graphically realised illustration of the imperial palace. Above each of the detailed illustrations, the motif is transposed in the form of a vacuum formed sheet This means that all the motifs in the book can also be experienced tactilely.
The photo shows the transparent deep-drawn tactile foil of the imperial palace on a dark background. Even the smallest details of the building's façade can be felt.
The photo shows the transparent deep-drawn tactile foil of the Kolster Church.

Detail pages

The photo shows a person opening the chapter Fabulous Creatures in the tactile book.
Left: Close-up of the transparent tactile film with image of the keystone from the Dominican monastery. Petals arranged in a circle can be seen on the brick. Right: Tactile image of the male mythical creature that decorated the central balcony of the Electoral Palace.

Project details

Project Scope: Moderation of focus group workshops, creation and production of the tactile book with six tactile foils and eight tactile detail illustrations, Graphic design and layout, Conceptualization and digitization of tactile images, production support

All graphics of the architecture illustrations in the tactile book summarised in one gif
Photo of a male mythical creature that decorated the central balcony of the Electoral Palace. It is a figure of man, animal and plant. Horns grow on the head, a beard protrudes from the face, the back has wings, and the lower part of the body ends in a curled tail with leaves at the end.
You can see several pages of the finished tactile book, loosely spread out on a table. The picture was taken during the bookbinding process.
Picture of a groping at one of the focus group meetings with threshold prints
Photo of several participants at one of the focus group meetings. The tactile elements of the tactile book were tested with the help of swell paper
One person tests one of the swell paper prints of the tactile map during a focus group meeting
Recording of several participants at one of the focus group meetings.
Recording of several participants at one of the focus group meetings.
Illustration of several conceptual designs during the realisation of the tactile book. Drawings of the graphic imperial castle and swell prints of the motif "sailboat" can be seen.
Further illustration of a tactile foil with associated graphic
Makin-of shot from the inkl design office. Two staff members are photographing the touch book. Professional lighting with spotlights and ring lights is set up in the room.
Illustration of the concept phase for the keystone motif. The process from the photographic image of the object via a drawing to the variant with tactile lines can be seen.
Detail of the keystone from the Dominican monastery on a red background. Petals arranged in a circle can be seen on the brick.

Kunstsammlungen Chemnitz

Metropolis, planned city,
city of the future

Hardly any other city in Germany has faced such constant and far-reaching change over the past centuries and decades as Chemnitz. Today, Saxony’s third-largest city has a museum, the Schlossberg Museum, which brings the city’s eventful history to life.

From a populous metropolis during the industrialization, to heavy destruction in World War II and reconstruction as the socialist planned city of Karl-Marx-Stadt, Chemnitz has experienced many facets. The Museum of Urban History now shows them with the help of four new tactile models.In the rooms of the monastery and castle complex on the Chemnitz Schlossberg, the “ink.Design models” flank existing city models and make the exhibition a good more inclusive.The four tactile city models show the respective development around 1500, around 1930 and 2020. One of the models is a plan model from 1960, documenting the urban planners’ ideas for the construction of an ideal city according to the standards of a socialist society.

Tactile models in the room

The photo shows an exhibition room of the Schlossbergmuseum Chemnitz. The floor and ceiling are made of wood, white walls divide the large room into different areas. In the foreground, one of the four tactile models stands on a white metal table. A visitor can be seen shadowily to the left and right of the table. He is touching the tactile model of the city.
Photo of one of the tactile city models taken from a corner of the table. In the foreground, therefore, an enlarged detail of the model in orange colour. It shows an example of the size and arrangement of the buildings in Chemnitz at that time. In the background, another model of the city in a large glass case and a wall with paintings.
Two close-up photos: On the left, a legend of the model - the word "Rathaus" as a high-contrast, tactile inscription and in Braille lettering. On the right, some houses as an enlarged detail.
An exhibition room of the Schlossberg Museum in which an older city model is displayed in a large glass case. Next to this model under glass are the four tactile models by inkl.Design, which invite you to touch them.
One of the tactile city models in an exhibition room. Paintings on the walls in the background. A visitor, who is only faintly visible, touches the clearly recognisable church of St. Jacobi on the city model.
Close-up: In each of the four tactile models, an enlarged section of the urban structure is shown three-dimensionally at one corner of the model. This photo shows the buildings in 1930.
View into an exhibition room where one of the tactile models and an older model under glass stand side by side. In the background, further objects on display.

Studiofotos

The tactile city model of the year 2020 in an overall view. The basis is a tactile ground plan. Some of the city's sights, such as the town hall and St. Jacobi's Church, are located on it as three-dimensional buildings. They are contrastingly made of a deep black material. In one corner of the model is a three-dimensional detail of the urban structure, also in high-contrast orange. High-contrast lettering can be seen all around. The model rests on a white metal table with orange accents.
Detailed image of the tactile inscription. Here the word "Chemnitz".
A close-up shows two hands touching the corner of the model where a three-dimensional detail of the building can be found. The base is clearly recognisable: a white metal table with the engraving "inkl. design", on top of which is a likewise white metal tray that supports the model. Between the two is an orange board.
A close-up shows the tactile floor plan and the tactile inscription of one of the models.
Two hands, coming into the picture from the right, are touching one of the models.
Detailed view of the tactile, three-dimensional buildings of the Town Hall and St. Jacobi Church.
Close-up of the enlarged detail of the urban development, which is located in the corner of each model. Here is the model of the planned city from 1964, showing a high-rise building and a congress centre.
A hand, coming into the picture from the left, touches the tactile lettering of the model of the planned city from 1964.

Inclusion in detail

Detail of the tactile inscription "Red Tower", also in Braille.
Fingers touching a Braille inscription. The tactile model is blurred in the background.
Close-up of the tactile floor plan, which forms the basis of the tactile model. Highlighted here in orange is the section within the floor plan, which is shown in the corner of the tactile model as a three-dimensional detail. A tactile dotted line connects the section and the three-dimensional detail.
Two detailed photographs showing the course of the Chemnitz River on the tactile floor plan. The river is highlighted in blue and touchable wavy lines make it tactilely comprehensible.
Detail of the engraving "inkl. design" on the white table supporting the model.

Project details

Project scope: Didactic concept for the implementation of the mediation goals for blind and visually challenged people, organization and implementation of focus group work, planning and implementation of the tactile displays including product design and 3D data creation, graphic design, production supervision and monitoring.
A shot from the office of inkl.Design: the team examines one of the three-dimensional models
The photo on the left shows the base plate of a tactile model lying on a wooden pallet - preparation for transport.
The photo shows two hands working on the base plate of a tactile model with a tool.
Orange tension belts labelled with inkl.design lie on the asphalt, a car in the background.
An employee of inkl.Design in a bright room with several of the white metal tables. She is working on assembling the tables.
Two employees of inkl.Design in a transporter. They load the tactile models.
A close-up of the tactile base plate of a model. Clearly recognisable different tactile structures and colours.
Close-up of one of the three-dimensional buildings in a matt, dark grey colour.
An employee of inkl.Design preparing the tactile model in the museum.
Several of the black three-dimensional buildings lie on a plastic sheet.
A shot from above shows four tactile floor plans of the tactile models arranged in a square on a large table.
Gregor Strutz from inkl.Design touches one of the tactile models in the museum with a satisfied expression on his face.
Gregor Strutz of Inkl Design tests a rotating tactile model in the museum.

Museum for Art and Cultural History, Gottorf Castle

Changing perspectives

The special exhibition “Colour Rush” is dedicated to the Berlin painter Christopher Lehmpfuhl in the Museum of Art and Cultural History, Gottdorf Castle in Schleswig. 140 works of the painter are shown. Two of them are now also accessible to blind and visually impaired people.

Christoph Lehmpfuhl himself describes his art as “haptic”. His impressive oil paintings live from the distinctive structures of color that the artist applies to the canvas with his hands. From close up, the viewer marvels at a rush of color made up of different layers and textures; from a distance, the motifs become more visible.

But how does the phenomenon of perspective is explained to a person who cannot see? What does color feels like that wrinkles?

For the inclusive approach, a large-scale oil painting of a mountain panorama, titled “Glockner-Duett” and a small-scale oil painting titled “Gläserstillleben” were selected.

In a tactile painting of the mountain panorama, reliefs at different heights recreate the proportions of the original. The fingers glide over color hills and valleys of acrylic and feel different structures.

The still life of glasses and bottle was recreated in three different tactile variations. A replica of the painting’s scenery with the artist’s original glasses can be grasped. A perspective-distorted representation that makes the phenomenon of perspective vivid and a classical tactile painting allow the work to be received on different levels.

The tactile models are placed opposite to their original oil painting and are a special haptic experience not only for blind and visually challenged people, but also for all visitors.

“I am very pleased that this exhibition has also been made accessible to blind visitors and that they can also gain access to my painting in this way,” says the artist in an e-guide to the show. “It is something very special and new for me.”

Tactile painting Gläserstillleben

View into an exhibition room of the "Schleswig Holstein Landesmuseum Schloss Gottorf." On the walls the paintings of the artist Lehmpfuhl, in the room the tactile model. Out of focus two visitors of the exhibition.
View of the tactile model of the glass still life, in the background on the wall hang paintings by the artist. On the far right, a black spiral staircase leads upward.
Photo of the three tactile models of the painting "Glass Still Life" on a table. On the far left info text, then the three-dimensional model of the painting, next to it a perspective-distorted three-dimensional view and on the far right a two-dimensional image of the painting with tactile lines.
Close-up of the painting "Glass Still Life" on a white wall. Immediately in front of it the corresponding tactile model on a table in three parts.

Tactile painting Glockner-Duett

View from above into a corner of the exhibition hall. On the left wall the very large, two-part painting "Bergwelten". In front of it on a table the tactile model to the painting.
View into a long exhibition hall. On the right on the walls the paintings of the artist. At the very front the painting "Bergwelten", in front of which the corresponding tactile model can be seen on a table. At the table, out of focus, a person.
View from above of the entire table with tactile model for the painting "Bergwelten". On the right is an attention field and a QR code.
Here you can see a detail of the tactile touch object and on the walls behind it you can see the painting "Bergwelten".

Studiofotos

In this close-up you can see the tactile model "Gläserstilleben". In the field of view is the lateral holder for the long cane and forearm support.
Side view with glasses and bottle of the tactile touch model "Gläserstilleben" with view of the holder for long stick and forearm support.
Oblique plan view of the table with bottle and glasses of the tactile model "Gläserstilleben". On the far left is the three-dimensional model of the painting, next to it is a perspective-distorted three-dimensional view and on the far right is a two-dimensional image of the painting with the tactile lines.
You can see a side perspective view of the tactile object with glasses and bottle.
View from above on the tactile model "Gläserstilleben" with the focus on the two-dimensional image of the painting with tactile lines.
The two tactile models "Gläserstilleben" and "Bergwelten" can be seen in a side shot.
The composition of the tactile models "Gläserstilleben" and "Bergwelten" shown in different variations from above.

Inclusion in detail

Detail photo with tactile model "Gläserstilleben" which is explored by one person with both hands.
Detailed image of the structures of the tactile model "Bergwelten".
Close-up of different structures of the tactile model "Bergwelten".
The tactile perspective of the glass still life is felt by a visually challenged woman. In addition, a close-up shows the holder for the cane
Detail photo of the tactile model "Bergwelten" which is felt by a woman with both hands.
Detailed image of the step structure and the different structures of the tactile model "Bergwelten".

Project details

Project scope: Didactic concept for the implementation of the mediation goals for blind and visually challenged people, organization and implementation of focus group work, planning and implementation of the tactile displays including product design and 3D data creation, graphic design, production supervision and monitoring.
View into the studio of inkl.design. At a table, an employee assembles the tactile model "Gläserstilleben".
The photo shows a staff meeting in the middle of the tactile models "Gläserstilleben" and "Bergwelten".
Photo of the assembly of the tactile model "Bergwelten" in the premises of Studio inkl.Design.
Photo of the composition of the tactile model "Bergwelten" in the studio incl.Design.
Detail of a glass jar of the tactile model "Gläserstilleben" in the studio of inkl.Design.
Photo shows the tactile model "Bergwelten" in the studio of inkl.Design during the assembling.
In the picture you can see an employee building the tactile model "Gläserstilleben" in the studio of inkl.Design.
An employee of inkl.Design inspects the quality of the production of the tactile model "Bergwelten".
Two employees in the inkl.design studio are shown. They are busy with the quality control of the cane holder.
Close-up of the structure of the tactile model "Bergwelten".
An employee of inkl.Design inspects the quality of the production of the tactile model "Bergwelten".
Photo of the tactile model "Bergwelten". The tactile lines are tested by a young woman with both hands.
On the photo you can see an employee during the product photography of the tactile model "Gläserstilleben" in the studio inkl.Design.

Jewish Museum Berlin

Architecture of emotions

The Jewish Museum in Berlin is Europe’s largest Jewish museum. The building by architect Daniel Libeskind is one of the city’s iconic landmarks. Its floor plan describes the fractures, distortions and abysses in the history of Judaism and the Holocaust. Our task was to make these tangible in tactile maps.

A broken Star of David that has become a museum is both a symbol and a room for experience. This space, with all its shafts, crooked walls and unclear paths, leads visitors onto shaky ground. The new tactile maps provide orientation.

To guide guests from all over the world through the multi-storey building with its redesigned permanent exhibition, we first identified important orientation spots in the museum. Together with the Jewish Museum and a focus group, the concept was tested for its practical usefulness before we “inkl. Designers” created the guidance plans.

Today, they fit seamlessly into the design of the rooms and at the same time make the theme of inclusion visible in an aesthetically sophisticated way. The tactile maps provide information in German and English. Their lettering was done in Braille and profile lettering as well as with a high contrast value that is easy to read.

In addition to the floor plans, we designed two tactile paintings for the Jewish Museum. One shows a portrait of Albertine Heine, which was created on the occasion of her marriage to Paul Mendelssohn-Bartholdy. The grandson of the famous philosopher Moses Mendelsohn was secretly engaged to Albertine for a long time; his father rejected the union.

The high-resolution print of the lush motif is covered with transparent acrylic, raised lines make the visible schematically tangible.

The second tactile painting shows a depiction by the artist Jankel Adler on the theme of the Sabbath. The scene shows domestic rest on the weekly holiday.

Tactile Painting Albertine Heine as bride

Photo of a room in the Jewish Museum in Berlin. In the center the painting "Albertine Heine as a bride". The painting hangs on a blue wall. The oil painting shows Albertine Albert in a wedding dress in front of a red, slightly opened curtain. In front of the artwork is the corresponding tactile model including explanation in Braille. Two visitors can be seen out of focus in the background on the left.
Two photos of a room in the Jewish Museum in Berlin. In the center of the left photo the painting "Albertine Heine as a bride" on the wall with tactile model of the artwork and explanation in black letter and Braille in front of it on a table. In the right photo an elderly person in a wheelchair next to the tactile model of the artwork.
Detail photo of the tactile model "Albertine Heine as a bride". Detail of the upper right half with "Albertine" in wedding dress and the acrylic imitated magnificent frame.
Detail photo of the tactile model "Albertine Heine as a bride". Detail of the upper right half tilted to the right. A hand feels the acrylic imitation of the magnificent frame.

Tactile Painting Sabbath

Photo of the painting "Sabbath" by Janker Adler in Jewish Museum in Berlin. The artwork hangs on a glass wall, which stands in the middle of the room. To the left you can see another much smaller painting by the same artist, showing a woman.
Two photos of the painting "Sabbath" by Janker Adler in the Jewish Museum in Berlin. The left picture shows the artwork on a mobile tactile plan. On the right side of the plan you can see the painting to be felt, on the left side the description in tactile letters and Braille. The mobile tactile plan lies on a white bench. On the right side of the plan is a slit for better hand holding.
Detail photo of the tactile model of the painting "Sabbath" by Janker Adler. You can see the right half of the tactile plan with the artwork in acrylic. Two hands are feeling the tactile painting.
Detail photo of the tactile model of the painting "Sabbath" by Janker Adler. You can see parts of the right half of the tactile plan with the artwork in acrylic, as well as parts of the left half with description in tactile letters and in Braille.

Tactile Maps

Photo of an interior of the Jewish Museum in Berlin. The room looks like a hallway. At the end of the hallway is an exhibition wall, on which hang two paintings. In the upper part of the room, near the ceiling, there are several white struts with quotes written on them in blue letters on a white background. On the right side, standing against the wall, you can see a tactile plan, which serves the orientation of visually impaired people in the museum building.
Two photos of the tactile map for orientation in the Jewish Museum in Berlin. The right photo shows a detailed view of the tactile map with its own location marked. The right photo shows a woman feeling the plan for orientation in the museum building. In the background, at the top of the ceiling, white struts can be seen from wall to wall with blue lettering on a white background.
Photo of the tactile map on a table for orientation in the Jewish Museum in Berlin. The tactile map shows on the right side the part of the museum where the visitor is right now. On the left side, smaller, you can see the entire museum building as a tactile plan. On the front left of the table is a cane holder with a number.
Two photos of tactile plans in the Jewish Museum in Berlin. The left picture shows the tactile plan mounted horizontally on the wall. This plan shows a section of the museum as a tactile plan with a stick holder on the left side. On the right side there is a detail picture with the writing: "Your location" in tactile lettering and Braille. The Braille writing is felt by one hand.
Photo of the tactile map in the Jewish Museum in Berlin fixed on a table. The table stands on the left in a corner which it fills completely. To the right of it, the wall ends and gives a view of the exhibition space with exhibits behind it.
Two photos of a tactile map in the Jewish Museum in Berlin on a table. In the left photo, a woman standing at the side of the table is feeling parts of the plan. A cane holder is attached to the left of the tactile plan.

Inklusion in Detail

In the photo, a woman is feeling a tactile plan with both hands. To her right, her cane for the blind is placed in the cane holder. At the back left you can see two people walking into the picture from the left.
Two photos from a tactile plan in the Jewish Museum in Berlin. The first picture shows a blind man's cane in the cane holder in detail. The second picture shows a detail of the tactile plan.
Detail photo of the tactile map in the Jewish Museum for orientation in the museum building in the entrance area.
Detail photo of the tactile map in the Jewish Museum in Berlin with the lettering in tactile letters and Braille "Familienalbum" in German and English
Two detail photos of the tactile plan in the Jewish Museum in Berlin. The left picture shows a small section of an edge of the tactile plan. The right picture also shows only a small section with the lettering in tactile letters and Braille "1. Etage" (1st floor) in German and English.
Detail photo of the upper part of a tactile model. The picture shows the painting "Albertine Heine as a bride" in the Jewish Museum in Berlin
Two photos of the tactile model of the painting "Albertine Heine as a bride". The left photo is a deail photo of the cane holder at the table of the tactile model with number and Braille. The right photo shows the upper part of the tactile painting and two groping hands.
Detail photo of the upper right corner of the tactile model of the painting "Sabbath" by Janker Adler from the Jewish Museum in Berlin
Two photos of the tactile model of the painting "Sabbath" by Janker Adler. The left photo is a detail view of the center of the acrylic tactile model and shows parts of the structure. The right photo shows a woman in the center of the photo sitting on a bench with a mobile tactile painting on her lap. The woman is palpating the center of the painting.
The photo shows a detailed view of the tactile painting "Sabbath" by Janker Adler. Two hands palpate the surface of the painting.

Project Details

Project Scope: Didactic concept for the implementation of the mediation goals for blind and visually challenged people, organization and implementation of focus group work, planning and implementation of the tactile displays including product design and 3D data creation, graphic design, production supervision and monitoring.

Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial Site

Remember and Commemorate

With a new concept, the Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial is setting a political example for diversity and – on the 75th anniversary of the liberation – is taking an important step towards inclusion. People with disabilities, who until 1945 were also among those who experienced immeasurable suffering at this site, can now explore the grounds independently and autonomously with the help of specially designed media.

The centerpiece of our work in Dachau is a new tactile model, made of metal, that provides an overview of the memorial site today and the extent of the concentration camp grounds in 1945. The advantage of this model, which is equally accessible to all people, is not only a lockable folding mechanism, which protects the structure even in outdoor spaces, but also a colored representation of the buildings, which makes it easy for visually challenged people to recognize. Accompanying information is provided by a tactile medium that can be carried along on the tour.
With audio descriptions, Braille, tactile profile writing and texts in contrasts for the visually challenged in German and English, it makes the intangible comprehensible during a visit to the memorial. The project, the only one of its kind in Germany, was preceded by an elaborate struggle to find the best solution. Many participants in the jury, including representatives of the Comité International de Dachau, gave weight to the decision in favor of the inkl.Design Concept.
Photo of the two installed tactile models in front of the entrance to the Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial Site.

Tactile Displays

Photo of a tactile model with an overview of the present memorial site including tactile lettering in Braille and profile lettering.
Detail photo of a tactile model with guard towers of the concentration camp in the foreground
Detail photo of a tactile model with buildings of the former concentration camp scanned by a finger
Detail photo of a tactile model with representation of various building complexes of the former concentration camp
Two detail photos of the tactile models "1945" and "Today "Left: Two visitors in the background talking about the tactile model

Renderings

Detail photo of a tactile plan with representation of a transparent tactile foil for path guidance
A rendering of the tactile model in the outdoor space

Accompanying Media

Photo of the mobile tactile maps with detailed information about the concentration camp memorial site
Detail photo of the mobile tactile plans with the tab "Introduction", "Today", "1945" and "Legend".
Two detail photos of a tactile map to show text pages with Braille and large print, and a color tactile site plan
Detail photo of a tactile plan with representation of a transparent tactile foil for path guidance

Inclusion in Detail

Photo of a wheelchair user and a blind woman at one of the tactile models
Two photos of a blind woman at the inauguration of the tactile models
Group photo of blind people at the inauguration of the tactile models
Two photos of members of the Bavarian Federation for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Photo of the project managers of the concentration camp memorial and the agency at the inauguration ceremony.

Project Details

Project scope: Didactic concept for the implementation of the mediation goals for blind and visually challenged people, material and production research for the production of robust tactile models, conception and implementation of a lockable model carrier, planning and implementation of the tactile displays including product design and 3D data creation, graphic design of accompanying media with tactile detail illustrations in German and English, organization and implementation of focus group work, creation of extensive audio description texts for blind-friendly image description, production of audio files, production supervision and monitoring
Photo of the assembly of a cardboard model as a functional model for model construction
A cardboard model of the tactile model
A detailed view of an untreated house model still packaged in transparent foil
Two employees assembling the folding mechanism of the touch model
A picture from the workshop during the assembly of the rotating body
An employee of inkl Design looking closely at the dismantled mode
Detailed view of one of the small model buildings of the metal tactile model
Detailed view of the miniature metal buildings
View of a metal plate with the Today lettering
Time-lapse animation of the assembly of the tactile model on site in Dachau
Two Inkl Design employees look at a dismantled model plate of the tactile model
An employee of inkl Design during the first inspection of the finished tactile model in closed condition
Gregor Strutz from inkl Design photographing a metal model plate
An employee of inkl Design doing the final touches on the tactile model
Detail photo of a dismantled metal model plate with partially screwed building models
A close-up of a built-in miniature building
A person feeling a sample production of part of the memorial buildings
Gregor Strutz feeling the finished model on site for the first time

LWL-Museum of Art and Culture

„Mensch!“ – a Museum Guide Book of a Special Kind

The LWL Museum of Art and Culture in Münster has been a pioneer for accessible art offers in North Rhine-Westphalia for years. We “inkl.Designers” were asked to develop and produce an art book with six tactile paintings from the museum’s permanent collection.

The selection of the paintings follows a red thread: How were and are people in different epochs represented in art? How did their artistic expression change over the centuries?

The spectrum ranges from the early Middle Ages, in which there are no worldly representations of humans at all, to the performance art of Joseph Beuys. Not only blind and visually challenged people, but all art lovers will gain an extraordinary insight into the Münster collection with this art book.

The time span of the motifs ranges from the 12th century with the Bockhorst triumphal cross, which shows the suffering Jesus not suffering at all but with his head raised, through the 16th century with the “Family Picture of Count Rietberg” by Herman tom Ring , which can be read like a marriage advertisement, to the 19th century with the painting “Lady with Child” by Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller. Paula Modersohns-Becker and Otto Mueller stand for the 20th century. The object “Küchenchef” by Joseph Beuys closes the extraordinary composition.

All motifs can be experienced sensually in an art book, which is accompanied by a comprehensive audio CD. Specially composed music and professionally recorded texts complete the package.

All six motifs are provided with transparently printed, tactile structures, which reproduce the most important details of the picture composition on the coloured original. In combination with the audio description, this results in a comprehensive impression for the viewer.

In addition to the art book, we have also produced five of the motifs as portable tactile paintings. Their low weight, the handy dimensions of approx. 35 x 50 cm and an even more concise tactile elaboration have already proven their worth during museum tours for blind people.

A Glance at the Tactile Book

Image of the tactile cover with braille
Excerpt with large Braille from the LWL touch book
Detail view of the tab system in the touch book
A person reads Braille on a lead page in the tactile book
View of the audio CD with audio descriptions in the tactile book
View sitting gypsy girl from touch book
Illustration of painting lady with child from tactile book
Detail of the tactile painting family portrait of Count Rietberg
Detail view of painting Lady with child with reinforced white lines for people with visual impairment
Fold-out page showing the family portrait of Count Rietberg
Representation of a person reading Braille
Representation of a fold-out page with the illustration "Chef" by Joseph Beuyz.

Portable Tactile Paintings

Photo of a person pulling a tactile painting from the accompanying carrier bag
Photo of a person pulling a tactile painting from the accompanying carrier bag
Detail of the tactile painting Bockhorster Triumphkreuz
Detail of the tactile painting "Sitting gypsy girl".
Photo of a person feeling the tactile painting gypsy girl
Detail view of tactile painting gypsy girl

In Detail:
Das Bockhorster Triumphkreuz

The Bockhorst triumphal cross in two views

Listen here to the text on the interpretation of the sculpture “Bockhorster Triumphkreuz” made of oak wood. (audio only in german)

Detail of the tactile painting Bockhorster Triumphkreuz
Detail of the tactile painting Bockhorster Triumphkreuz
Detail view of the Bockhorst triumphal cross

In Detail: Paula Modersohn-Becker,
Self-Portrait with White Pearl Necklace

Photo with mobile tactile painting self portrait with pearl necklace

Listen here to the text on the interpretation of the painting “Self-Portrait with White Pearl Necklace” by Paula Modersohn-Becker.


Photo with mobile tactile painting self portrait with pearl necklace
Detail of the pearl necklace of the tactile painting Self-portrait of Paula
Detail of the pearl necklace of the tactile painting Self-Portrait of Paula

Project Details

Project scope: Creation and production of the tactile book “Mensch!” with tactile illustrations, graphic design and layout, planning and implementation of five mobile tactile paintings with matching carrier bag, including product design and 3D data creation. Support of studio recordings audio CD, production support and music selection

Lebenshilfe Berlin

That’s what we’re here for!

Anyone who took the public transport in Berlin in spring and summer became aware of an anniversary of a special kind: Lebenshilfe Berlin (“Life Aid Berlin”) turned 60. Founded as a parents’ initiative in 1960, the association enabled thousands of children and adults with cognitive or learning difficulties to lead a self-determined life. This was to be celebrated in style.

Therefore, Lebenshilfe asked us to create a self-confident campain – to show the pride and self-conception of the people at Lebenshilfe who live and work together.

We “inkl.Designers” enjoyed this campaign very much. We learned a lot, laughed and tried out. Last but not least, the campaign is also a first and very fine joint work, which we designed with our office neighbours from DiG/Plus Berlin.

At the heart of the new Lebenshilfe campaign are the large-scale motifs. They show people who are right in the middle of life, who fulfil themselves because they are taken seriously just as they are. The protagonists give an insight into the wide range of services offered by the organisation, whose aim is to make people with disabilities a self-evident part of society.

“That’s what we are here for” is the motto of Lebenshilfe: for listening, accompanying, making possible and making visible what is inside us. A special highlight were the photo shootings. Everyone involved – in front of and behind the camera – rose above themselves and put something big on the road.

The videos created during the shooting capture honestly and impressively what the work of Lebenshilfe is all about: growing and becoming strong together. We are deeply impressed and inspired by the “Life Helpers”.

Take a look at www.dafür-sind-wir-da.de – it could be that this enthusiasm grabs you just as much as it does us.

Logo 60 years of Lebenshilfe
Large poster of the motif "Lebenshilfe rocks" with four people who organize a party for people with and without disabilities every year.
Large poster of the motif "Bridge builder" with an employee of the intercultural advice centre of Lebenshilfe Berlin
Large poster of the motif "tackling dreams", which shows a handicapped young man in an outfit from the 1920s, who wants to study fashion design.

Anna is Curative Education Nurse and Sarah is Client in the Day Support Center Neukölln.

Photo of an enormously happy, severely disabled young woman in a wheelchair and her carer during the photo shooting
Large poster of the motif "Show what you can do" with the severely disabled young woman and her carer and the stamped anniversary logo of Lebenshilfe Berlin
Photo showing the photographer shooting the subject with the severely disabled young woman and her carer
The photo shows a shot in the underground with the large poster of the motif "Show what you can do" and approaching train

„Working with people gives you a lot in return.
It’s not cold, it’s warm.
And there’s a lot of joy in it. Joy and heart.

Photo showing two people full of joy, a woman and a man, who have continuously developed into managers at Lebenshilfe Berlin

Mike is the boss of 200 employees. He started working for Lebenshilfe Berlin 20 years ago as a curative education nurse.

Large poster of the motif "Something solid", which shows a tattooed, muscular man who has developed from a Curative Education Worker to a current senior staff member of Lebenshilfe
Photo from the shooting with the former Curative Education Worker and current senior staff member, holding the anniversary logo in his folded arms
Photo of the poster motif "something solid" in the Stadtmitte underground station
Photo from the shoot with two friendly Lebenshilfe residential care workers, including a former migrant from Togo
Large poster of the motif „By conviction fellow human beings“ which shows two caretakers from Lebenshilfe Berlin, including one who comes from Togo.

„You are important and they are important and they realize that it’s real. And just as I am authentic to them, they are authentic to me.
And that’s what makes it so special.“

Picture of the large-surface motif "Ehrenfrauen" showing two women with the anniversary logo who are working at Lebenshilfe
Photo from the shooting "Ehrenfrauen", which shows both relaxed and happy in the studio
Photo from the shooting with the photographer and the two fooling around women for the motif "Women of Honour".
Photo of the "bridge builder" in the studio, her posture corrected by the director of the photo shoot
Snapshot of the intercultural consultant in the studio from the motif "Bridge builder
Another snapshot of one of the home carers from the motif "Aus Überzeugung Mitmensch" in the studio
Snapshot of the two "honorary wives" in the studio
Another snapshot of one of the home carers from the motif "Aus Überzeugung Mitmensch" in the studio
Snapshot of karate boxing attendant in studio
Photo of two disabled soccer fans of Hertha BSC and Juventus Turin from the same shared apartment, hugging each other amicably in the studio
Portrait photo of a young disabled woman from "Lebenshilfe rocks" motif
Portrait photo of disabled aikido fighter shooting
Snapshot of a disabled aikido fighter and a karate-boxing handler during the shoot
Situation photo from the shooting for the motif "Out of conviction fellow human beings
Photo from off camera at the shooting for the motif "Something solid“
Photo from off camera at the shooting for the motif "Lebenshilfe rocks
Off-camera photo at the shooting for the motif "Tackling Dreams"
Situation photo from the shooting for the motif "Tackling dreams".

Project Details

Project scope: Consulting, campaign concept and planning, media planning, casting of disabled people and employees of Lebenshilfe Berlin, photo shooting, graphic design of poster motifs (large surfaces and A1) and merchandising products, various texts, shooting and editing of videos, development of a barrier-free website, social media activities, production support

Aktion Mensch e.V.

Die Bunte Bande

How about that? All children can read the same book. Visually challenged children, blind children, deaf children, children with learning difficulties, your children. There’s no special treatment, no complicated separate way anymore. One edition for everybody. Easy-Peasy?

That’s exactly the kind of groundbreaking and important book project we inkl.Designers are tackling together with “Aktion Mensch”, for the very first time in Germany.

The children’s book series “Die Bunte Bande” (“The Colourful Gang”) around the five friends Tessa, Tom, Jule, Henry and Leo – each with their individual strengths and weaknesses – introduces topics like diversity and inclusion in a way that’s exciting and suitable for children at the same time.

In earlier editions of “Bunte Bande” only its content was related to inclusion. But quite quickly it became clear: it’s all or nothing. The goal had to be a fully inclusive edition.

Because there were no comparable books on the market for the target group – children between the ages of eight and eleven – we had to become experts ourselves in order to develop a completely new, inclusive book for all new readers. For younger visually challenged and blind children there are a handful of well-designed picture books.

But when the sensitive phase of early support ends with school entry, it looks pretty dark as far as appealing book material is concerned.

But what special needs do challenged children have when they are learning to read? How can large print, Braille and Easy-to-Read Language be elegantly and reader-friendly reconciled? Together with experts from special education, didactics and everyday experts, we have developed suitable theories and found convincing solutions.

Not only in terms of design, but also in the large-scale production of a circulation of 2,000 books, we have broken new ground with the “Bunte Bande”.
The fifth volume “The Stolen Bike” is pioneering. We are proud of our first inkl.Design children’s book. And we can be, because the edition of the children’s book series realised by inkl.Design with partners is winner of the German Design Award 2020 in the category Universal Design, received the prize “Outstanding Books for Young People With Disabilities 2019” and was awarded the Kimi seal for diversity 2018.

And by the way: to make sure young readers can enjoy the earlier adventures of the „Bunte Bande“ as well, we subsequently realized also them as inclusive books in the combination of Easy-to-Read Language, large print and Braille.

A Glance at the Book

Cover of the book "Die Bunte Bande, Das gestohlene Fahrrad". In the upper left corner of the picture a black circular sticker. In it, 5 colourful hands are visible. On it is written in large white letters: \"Inclusion in Germany\". In the lower left corner the seals of the prizes for the Bunte Bande
Close-up of an inside page of the book with all members of the Coloured Gang and Braille
Close-up of an inside page of the book. At the top left of the picture, an illustration is visible in which an educator is applying make-up to a child. Below this is a text in both black and braille. At the upper right edge of the picture, a pictogram with Braille is arranged. An arrow points to the braille of the book page.
An open double page of the book. Across the entire format is an illustration of the colourful gang with educator Ben. Again, blackletter and braille are combined. The next easy-language page is already peeking out from the right edge of the book.
Close-up of a blue easy language page, which always follows a double page with everyday language and Braille. In the upper left corner of the picture is a pictogram for easy language. An arrow points to the book page.
Close-up of a blue easy language page, which always follows a double page with everyday language and Braille. In the upper left corner of the picture is a pictogram for easy language. An arrow points to the book page.
In a row, the issue of the Bunte Bande \"Das gestohlene Fahrrad\" (The Stolen Bicycle) lies next to other subsequently inclusive issues of the Bunte Bande.

Inclusion in Use

Graphic of a double page with explanations of the individual elements of the page
Graphic explaining the structure of the book
Photo of a blind woman reading from The Colourful Gang to three interested sighted children
Photo of a blind woman with two girls sitting next to her, feeling the Braille dots in the coloured ribbon
Photo of a blind woman reading from an inclusive children's book to three sighted children. Everyone is visibly enjoying themselves and laughing merrily.
Six incl-designers celebrate the children's book award with confetti and streamers. They hold a banner that reads: 2019 Selection of Outstanding Books for Young People with Disabilities.

Project Details

Project Scope: Development of a publication concept for the first inclusive children’s book in Germany, Consulting of illustrators, Advice on technical production issues (Braille, book binding, logistics), Consulting (typography, fonts, contrasts), Realisation of the braille text
Earlier Bunte Band issues lying side by side.
A boy looks over the top of the book with wide eyes.
a red coloured area
A hand feels the Braille letters in the Bunte Bande book
A grass green coloured surface
A girl and two boys are sitting side by side on the floor with their backs against a wall. The girl reads the stories of the colourful gang to the two boys.
Cover of a proof copy of the book "Die Bunte Bande, Das gestohlene Fahrrad" (The Colourful Gang, The Stolen Bicycle) with many yellow correction slips in it
Close-up of a hand sticking a correction note into the boo
Close-up of the book cover "Die Bunte Bande, Der neue Bandentreff".
A dark blue coloured area
A cosy listening room can be seen. The book "Die Bunte Bande" (The Colourful Gang) is being read aloud on the stage. On the floor in front of it, children sit and lie on colourful cushions and listen intently.
A bright yellow coloured surface
Close-up of an illustration of a girl with a correction slip on it
A child reads a Bunte Bande book and feels over the braille letters.
Close-up of an illustration from the book. A magnifying glass enlarging a text

St. Nicholas’ Church Museum

Understanding Architecture

Look at that! Almost on our own doorstep and in the historical center of Berlin, we “inkl.Designers” realised for the first time an inclusive museum project. Needless to say that here at home we were particularly happy to implement all that inkl.Design stands for.

In the converted Nikolaikirche (“St. Nicholas’ Church”) the church history of Berlin is told. Five new tactile models and audio guides are now available to guests from all over the world, enabling them to understand church architecture over the course of time. These models can be used by everyone, regardless of whether they are living with or without a disability.

The essence of the idea of inclusion has come to life here in inspiring teamwork: On the way to an exhibition that is easy to use for all visitors, we and our colleagues at the Stadtmuseum have coordinated all the planning steps with a focus group. Representatives of the Association for the Visually Impaired, students of the European University Viadrina in the Master’s programme Protection of European Cultural Assets, as well as blind and visually impaired museum friends critically tested our designs and thus made the result even better.

The new, high-quality 3D models for the permanent exhibition now illustrate the step-by-step development of the Nikolaikirche. The origins of the church, made of field stone, brick extensions, later a copper roof and an interior with a cross vault, can thus be traced in different models on site. Innovative tactile guidance as well as the sensible use of different materials are aesthetically appealing and inclusive.

The audio texts are conceived in the same inclusive sense, for everyone: they give both blind and sighted people orientation on the models and descriptive explanations.

The pilot project in cooperation with the Stadtmuseum Berlin was realized in only half a year. This was a sporty project, we Berliners would say. And a great hit anyway.

Photo from the focus group meeting at which the concept is explained using threshold prints. Here a blind woman is feeling the west façade of the Nikolaikirche.
Inkl staff member Franziska reads out her draft text in the focus group meeting. Inkl staff member Mia listens in.
The photo shows a stack of different swell paper prints made for the focus group meetings.
Colleague Gregor explains the design ideas to a blind person using a cardboard model of the Nikolai Church.
The photo shows a stack of different swell paper prints made for the focus group meetings
A blind man tries to grasp a cardboard model of the vault of St. Nicholas Church with the help of Gregor.
Photo of a hand feeling the west façade of the large church model of the Nikolaikirche.
Photo of a hand feeling the west façade of the large church model of the Nikolaikirche.
Group photo of the incl. staff at work in the Nikolai Church
The hands of a blind person feel the swell pressure of the west façade. The hand of a sighted person accompanies the hands of the blind person.
The hands of a blind person feel the swell pressure of the west façade. The hand of a sighted person accompanies the hands of the blind person.
In the photo you can see various swell paper prints of the Nikolaikirche and an aluminium plate, which is intended as a base for the mobile map.

A Glance at the Tactile Displays

Left: The photo shows the material samples of the west facade, in the background it shows the complete model of the Nikolaikirche. Right: This photo shows the complete model of the Nikolaikirche, in the background the church room is visible.
This photo shows the first station of the exhibition from the back. In the foreground is the back of the Nikolaikirche, in the background is the model of the west facade with the material samples.
This photo shows the model of the west facade. Beside the west facade are material samples of the west facade.
Left: The photo shows the second station of the exhibition. There is the vault model, the wall model and the tactile cross-sectional graphic. Right: This photo shows the tactile inscription of the tactile station, the lower ends of the vault model and two figures which serve as a reference for the size of the mode
This photograph shows the wall elevation with tactile caption.

Renderings

Left: Graphic of the complete tactile model of the Nikolaikirche. Right: Graphic with the view of the north side of the Nikolaikirche.
This graphic shows the complete model with the cut open interior of the Nikolaikirche.
Left: This graphic shows the interior of the Nikolaikirche with the organ gallery, four pillars and the vault. Right: This graphic shows the complete model with the cut open interior of the Nikolaikirche.
Left: This graphic shows the vault model of the Nikolaikirche. Right: This graphic shows the vault model of the Nikolaikirche from below.
This graphic shows the model of the wall cutout of the Nikolaikirche.
Left: This graphic shows a detail of the wall cut-out: the vault approach. Right: This graphic shows the detail of the choir circumference of the wall cut-out.

Accompanying Media

This photo shows the front of the flyer for the exhibition extension. On the front of the flyer you can see the interior of the Nikolaikirche which is overprinted with red braille dots and the logo of the city museum.
This photo shows the front and back of the flyer for the exhibition extension. On the inside the text is in white on a red background. Here the Braille dots are printed transparent.
This photo shows the mobile maps of the Nikolaikirche. These cards can be borrowed at the cash desk of the Nikolaikirche for blind and visually impaired visitors.

Inclusion in Detail

Sighted and blind visitors will explore the large model of the Nikolai Church at the opening.
Left: A blind visitor feels the model of the west facade. She uses the audio guide to get information about this section of the Nikolaikirche. Right: Four visitors stand in front of the second tactile station and explore the three different models.
Hands feel the material samples of the west facade, which are mounted next to the model of the west facade.
Left: Hands feel the model of the vault of the Nikolaikirche. Right: In the foreground of the photo, the second station of the exhibition is depicted, at the end of the station two men are standing having a conversation.
The photo shows the large model of the Nikolaikirche. Behind the model, on the cut side, two visitors look at the interior of the church model

Project Details

Project Scope: Guidance and part-moderation of the focus group meetings, conception and implementation of the tactile station including product design, 3D data creation, graphic design, involvement in the creation of comprehensive audio description texts for image description suitable for blind and visually challenged people, production support and monitoring

State Library
Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania

Library for All

Imagine an aged library building. Can you picture the dusty signs with lots of long complex numbers on them? Anyone looking for something here, really needs the patience to find it. We at inkl.Design cracked this tough nut joined forces with Schwerin interior designer Michael Baldauf! After a comprehensive accessibility analysis and a concept for accessibility for the building also the needs of people with limitations are considered. Therefore we have not only graphically polished up the wayfinding system, but also moved half of the library.

Our biggest challenge: in the library, the book stock is changing constantly. Nothing remains where it is forever. Therefore the labelling had to be changeable and must allow for all possibilities. Inkl. took drastic measures on the former chaos and turned it into little bites that are easier to digest.

Instead of numbered rooms you will now find only numbers for subject areas. If the inventory moves, the number still remains the same. If the book stock moves the number will remain the same. The labeling system we came up with uses innovative magnets, so it can be expanded, reused and further developed at any time.

To further enhance the quality of the stay at the library we also set up reading corners. Striped wallpapers (it looks like a bookshelf) in the colours of the respective section create a good atmosphere.

And if you’re wondering why an ordinary library should consider people who are restricted in their mobility, are visually challenged or blind, we would like to bring up some politics here: Germany is one of the first countries to acknowledge the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. It has been committed to the comprehensive inclusion of people with disabilities since 2009.

So it is about time for a reorganisation – also in the Schwerin library.

Photo of one of the orientation boards on a rolling pallet in the manufacturer's factory
Photo of one of the orientation boards on a rolling pallet in the manufacturer's factory
Photo of one of the orientation boards on a rolling pallet in the manufacturer's factory
A young woman in a wheelchair in close-up; smiling, she holds a tactile overview plan in her left hand, with her right hand she gives a "thumbs up".
A young woman in a wheelchair in close-up; smiling, she holds a tactile overview plan in her left hand, with her right hand she gives a "thumbs up".
square sign to mark area B (white capital letter B on light green background)
Pictogram signalling lockable storage of bags and backpacks
Photo with section of the brightly coloured rod elements
Photo of the circulation counter, which picks up on the design of the library entrance with the brightly coloured rod elements.
square sign to mark area C (white capital letter C on magenta background)
Close-up of a pictogram indicating quiet areas; on the left the silhouette of a head, in front of it a hand with index finger in front of the mouth, in addition the lettering "Psst".
Close-up of the self-check-in; here the slot for entering the user card is marked by an infographic, below it the pattern with the coloured lines on a grey background.
Photo of the circulation counter, which picks up on the design of the library entrance with the brightly coloured rod elements.
Shot during the implementation of an instruction manual; some elements of the infographic are crossed out, plus handwritten additions and improvements on the printout.
Pictogram informing about video surveillance: a white exclamation mark on a dark grey triangle, to the right of it a stylised video camera and the writing "Video"
Photo of a signalisation for the use of the lifts in the house

Graphic Concept

2Overview sign with exchangeable information on the area, subject areas and room numbers".
Overview sign with the room assignments on the 4 levels of the Landesbibiothek.

Instruction Manual

Operating instructions for the central printer with infographics and text.
Photo of the book return with infographic and text
Operating instructions for self-checkout of loans with infographics and text
Operating instructions for the lockers with infographics and text

Design in Detail

Photo of a coloured signage in the staircase of the library for orientation in the building complex
Photo looking into the work area with reading tables, book shelves and notice boards.
Photo of the main entrance staircase to the first floor with signposts for routing and area marking.
Interior of a locker with the corresponding operating instructions
Interior of a locker with the corresponding operating instructions
Photo looking at a glass door with a strip of coloured sticks as door signalling
Photo looking at a wall surface consisting of a carpet of coloured sticks in a hallway
Left photo: Photo showing a view of a coloured lift sign Right photo: Photo showing the front of a shelf of the open access library with magnetic signs for stock indication and a book deposit table
Photo with view into a stairwell with tactile overview plans and information signs
Photo with view into a stairwell with tactile overview plans and information signs

Inclusion in Use

A blind young woman feels the tactile overview plans at the service counter of the State Library.
two-part image; left: Close-up of tactile fingers on a tactile overview map of the State Library; right: four tactile overview maps embedded in the service counters also offer sighted people the opportunity to find their way around within the library.
two-part image; left: Close-up of tactile fingers on a tactile overview map of the State Library; right: four tactile overview maps embedded in the service counters also offer sighted people the opportunity to find their way around within the library.

Project Details

Project scope: Comprehensive accessibility analysis, inclusion concept for visitors with disabilities, analysis of orientation needs, advice on planning services for tactile floor indicators in outdoor and indoor areas, conception of a wayfinding system, product design of a wayfinding system with updatable elements, conception of barrier-free elements of a wayfinding system (2-sense principle), pictograms, layout and graphic design, production support